COVID-19 Update: An Outbreak Amid New Changes to Saint Anselm College’s COVID Policies and Protocols

As new COVID-19 cases in New Hampshire are tracked to its colleges and universities, Saint Anselm College finds itself included in the upward trend. At the 11th meeting of the Student Senate at the start of the week, President Favazza expressed optimism that the college would be able to enter yellow phase. However, after an uptick in cases, the college will remain in orange phase for the time being.

“We’re up to 20 something [COVID-19 cases this week]. Which we’ve never had, even in the fall semester, we’re gonna stay in orange for now,” said Favazza. “We just got to see some trending in the right direction. We’re not looking for zero positives. We’re looking for small numbers to take some pressure off of our isolation and quarantine space.” 

In reaction to an extreme uptick of cases on their campuses, the University of New Hampshire, Franklin Pierce University, along with others, have gone fully remote in an effort to keep their communities safe. 

On the college’s COVID-19 dashboard, Favazza noted phase red was there for a reason. “If it keeps going up, [phase red] is absolutely on the table,” said Favazza. “I’m hoping that we don’t get there.” 

What’s changed on campus?

After listening to student concerns and an unprecedented fall semester, Saint Anselm College implemented new policies and protocols to try to better address COVID-19. With these changes comes the phase reopening system, increased testing capacity, and efforts for more transparency  between the administration and the student body. 

What has not changed is the college’s need for a “bubble.” The addition of two testing machines has significantly increased the college’s testing capacity. “For move-in testing, we did 400 a day, which is a lot. And then when we repeated to secure the bubble, we did it again,” says Maura Marshall, director of Health Services.

With the increase in testing capacity, the college can more often test students that are higher-risk than others, such as commuters and athletes. With regards to other students that live on campus and do not have to leave for other commitments such as internships or medical appointments, they are tested alphabetically.

“We have certain students that are frequently traveling off-campus, so they go once a week, and then the other ones, we fill in through the alphabet.”

“That’s where people are getting [COVID-19], they’re getting it from off-campus” noted Marshall. “They’re leaving campus frequently, so we want to keep testing them on a regular basis.

In an email to discourage students from leaving campus, Director of Department of Safety and Security, Rob Browne, it was announced that a third-party security firm would be staffed at entry points to campus, during Thursday, Friday, and Saturday evenings. 

As draconian as the effort sounded, the gates are meant to be a reminder to not leave campus, rather than a real, physical, security checkpoint. “Even though it may feel like it, we are not a prison,” Favazza said, laughing. “We’re not gonna put fences up, spotlights, guard dogs and everything else.” 

Favazza stressed that the risk of leaving campus is not only the possibility of outbreaks on campus, but also spreading COVID-19 to the surrounding area that is not a part of the Saint Anselm community. The rise of COVID-19 cases in NH colleges serves as a reminder that students also have a responsibility to protect others and keep the local community safe as well, said Favazza. 

Admissions Provides Insight into Frequency of Perspective Student Visits

When we returned to campus in August, it was not clear how admissions would be impacted by the pandemic, especially for students hoping to visit the Hilltop during the 2020-2021 school year before applying. With most students on campus, it was important to limit the risk of a COVID-19 outbreak coming from visitors. 

For the beginning of the fall semester, tours and visitors were not allowed on campus, but as the semester progressed, students planning to apply were allowed to visit with increased safety precautions from past years. Students and parents were required to wear masks and stay with admissions staff during their entire time on campus. Tours were also accompanied by a second admissions staff member who cleaned any surfaces touched with sanitizing wipes. 

According to Steve Goetsch, Vice President of Enrollment for the college, students were screened for COVID-19 symptoms upon their arrival, and later in the semester they were required to have a negative test before being allowed on campus.

So far, this has not significantly impacted the number of students who have applied or been accepted for the Fall 2021 semester, nor has it impacted the number of students transferring to Saint Anselm College during the school year, according to admissions staff.

The cancellation of SAT testing in the spring was also expected to impact admissions. Though Saint Anselm College is “test optional”, the nursing program typically requires test scores for admission. The nursing program is also test optional now, and as usual, there was a lot of interest in the program. 

It is too early to tell exactly what impact the pandemic is having on admissions, at Saint Anselm College and across the country, but as application deadlines pass, it will likely become more clear before the next school year begins.

Favazza Promises Progress for Spring Semester; Changes Prompted by Students

In less than a week, the currently sleepy hilltop will be abustle with students, monks, faculty and administration alike, all striving toward the monolithic goal that lays ahead: finish the spring 2021 semester on time, and on campus.

What the Saint Anselm College community achieved last semester, through the dedication and hard work of many, was impressive. While many other schools and institutions (sorry, SNHU) closed for the semester, Saint Anselm College kept students on campus, and closed out the semester without needing a lockdown or any other drastic measures. The students of Saint Anselm, despite the fatigue, strain, and seemingly endless sources of stress, were happier and better off being on campus. This effort, it should be noted, was an imperfect and an incomplete one.

The Student Response Task Force, under the purview of the Student Government Association, compiled and presented to the administration and student body an in-depth look at the achievements and shortcomings of the school during the fall semester, aimed at the goal of improving the school’s response for the coming semester. In an interview with President Favazza in the week before the student body’s return to campus, Doctor Favazza shed some light on the changes the college is making for the spring.

The President of the College began with noting that he, and the other COVID preparation teams, listened to the student feedback. One of the major criticisms the student body levied at the admin was the lack of transparency in the process of loosening restrictions on campus and “opening up” more normal interactions. Despite weeks of “reviewing intervisitation”, these reviews never produced any change, nor inspired any optimism among students. To combat this, President Favazza described a “phase system” where the college would clearly move from different levels of openness and restrictions. Admitting that last year’s methodology of loosening and tightening restrictions was “pretty vague”, Favazza pledged improvement, saying “We are gonna be very clear about the different phases through the semester. We have identified five phases”.

The president stayed mum on what these particular phases would entail, but was willing to provide insight into potential resources that might be “opened up” in the looser phases. Favazza provided some hope when he detailed what might be some exciting developments for dining on campus: “When we get into moderate activity or lighter restrictions, we are looking to be able to open, at least one day a week, the pub, with limited restrictions…hopefully if it can work, open the grille”.

While he didn’t provide specifics, he also indicated that intervisitation would be revamped for the new semester: “We are looking to add ways where we can make the student experience richer…visitation, moving that to a broader visitation, with lighter restrictions”. While students have heard this before, and might be dubious about these claims, they might be heartened to know that a Student Government proposal to increase intervisitation within buildings was passed through the Student Senate and to the administration before the end of last semester.

Visitation and other social needs are closely tied to what should be remembered as the administration’s biggest struggle of the Fall 2020 semester: student mental health. The college should be commended for keeping the positivity rate low, and being ahead of the curve on rapid testing accessibility, but the scourge of college and COVID-related anxiety, stress, and depression was on full display at the end of the fall semester. In response to this, Favazza detailed some promising changes and programs meant to address this growing issue.

The Anselmian Anchors program, first mentioned in Favazza’s email last week, is a program where college staff and faculty will be assigned to students who test positive or are quarantined as a result of contact tracing: “This is coming out of a recommendation from students, one of the focuses of this is providing more care to those who test positive and to those who quarantine. ‘Case workers’ will be assigned students in quarantine, and will check in on them to see how they are doing. It’s a pretty isolating thing, [quarantine], and it gets to the issue of mental health.”

To further the college’s effort of improving communication with the student body, Favazza also revealed that there will be a COVID-19 resource page on Canvas. This page is to present resources for students who test positive or are in quarantine, make clear the college reopening phases, as well as the metrics they rely upon, and more mental health resources related to the virus.

During our discussion, President Favazza revealed that some (not all) professors indicated to him that they were rethinking the workload they were assigning students. “They, a few faculty have had conversations with me understanding that the workload, perhaps trying to recalibrate this, you have to remind yourself students are taking three or four [other classes]”. Many students throughout the fall semester lamented the apparent dearth of understanding that the administration and many professors had with regards to student mental health, workload, and the unique strain of online learning.

To make in-person learning more attainable, the college has made physical modifications to Poisson and the third floor of Alumni hall. Walls were removed over break to ensure that classes that would have otherwise been hybrid will have the capacity for all the students in the class, thus eliminating the need for synchronous zoom sessions.

If nothing else, students should be assured that the college did not rest on its fall accomplishments this semester. The college has made changes, and claims that many of these changes were made as a result of student advocacy, whether through the Student Task Force or Mental Health Committee, or elsewhere. President Favazza remarked that, unlike last semester where we expected the virulence of the pandemic to increase as time went on, this semester, we are going headfirst into the deep-end.

“I don’t think anyone has any illusions over the first few weeks of the semester, it’s gonna get tough…but it will get better, we will have more options”. Favazza expressed hope for the college as the semester continued, noting that nursing students and eligible faculty would have higher access to the vaccine as time goes on, given current New Hampshire state guidelines. However, the college will be at an advantage this semester when it comes to detecting the virus on campus. The college has tripled its testing capacity, now with three rapid testing machines instead of just one.

The administration has promised, above all else, improvements in communication and transparency for the spring semester. Many of these improvements have come about thanks to the hard work and organization of students, and will be implemented by receptive administrators. If these things don’t end up coming to light, it would not have been for a lack of student advocacy.

The Hilltop beckons us all back to her rolling emerald hillocks and towering umber masonry. We must answer its call and return to our home away from homes, unified in our gratitude for the achievements of last semester, as well as our determination to do better this time. All of us- students, admin, faculty and the monastic community- have a duty to these ends.

Students Advocate For Students: Student Response Task Force Publishes Report To The College

In an email to students sent out on Monday, the Student Government Association announced that the Student Response Task Force (SRTF) had completed its work and had published its findings in a report entitled, “A Report on the Student Response to the College Policies Regarding the COVID-19 Pandemic.” The SRTF was formed in early October under the purview of the SGA by Student Body Vice President Kevin Chrisom. The task force, composed of 12 SGA members, met twice a week through October and November in order to gather student feedback through listening sessions, Instagram polls, and an anonymous submission form in order to then draft their report for the Saint Anselm College administration.

All students were invited to participate in two “Student Listening Sessions” on October 28th and November 4th where students were asked for their opinions on a wide variety of topics related to the college’s COVID policies. Students had a lot to say. The report states that approximately 40 students took the opportunity to make their voices heard, and said things such as, “I have always felt that Saint A’s has supported their students except for this year. It is beyond frustrating to see the school hosting tours and weddings yet I am not even allowed to have my mom or my friends to my apartment for lunch.”

A total of 448 students participated in a series of SRTF sponsored Instagram polls which demonstrated the collective feelings of many students. Out of the 448, 95% of student participants favored extending the hours of the Jean Student Center, and 94% of the respondents also favored some form of intervisitation policy being reinstated. When asked whether or not the college had done enough for student socialization, 74% of respondents said that it had not. Unsurprisingly, 73% of student participants responded that they did not think that online or hybrid classes were as productive as a typical school year. Finally, despite a rather large portion (28%) of students claiming that their experience at Saint Anselm had been negative in the fall semester, 95% of student respondents said that they felt safe on campus.

The SRTF also provided an anonymous feedback submission form for students who were not comfortable attending the listening sessions or providing their feedback in person. 45 students chose this option. Of those students, 9% were from the class of 2021, 33% from the class of 2022, 33% from the class of 2023, and 15% from the class of 2024.

The twenty-two-page report paints a detailed picture of the fall 2020 semester and the effects it had on the students of Saint Anselm College. It highlights some of the measures that students found beneficial such as President Favazza’s Town Halls, a well-designed move-in plan, and quick and effective mitigation of campus outbreaks, as well as some significant areas of student concern. The report lists 27 specific issues that students voiced to the task force, ranging from a lack of enforcement of COVID policies to overbearing course loads. 

Although the student body only recently received the finalized report, the Student Response Task Force met multiple times with President Favazza and Dean of Students Finn to discuss their findings and provide recommendations on how to improve the experience of students in the spring semester. When asked how he would characterize the SRTF’s meetings with Favazza and Finn, SGA Vice President Chrisom said, “I am very appreciative of the level of thought and care both Dean Finn and President Favazza showed to us during our work.” He added, “On a more personal note, I would like to thank both of them for the job they have done throughout the year and look forward to continuing working with them in advocating for the students.”

The publication of the report and its subsequent delivery to the student body marks a major milestone in the task force’s work, and the question now becomes, “Where will they go from here?” When asked, Chrisom said, “There are several avenues to which we could go,” but that the direction of the Task Force will rely largely on the environment and circumstances of the upcoming semester. Chrisom then mentioned that “the task force plans to continue listening sessions and encourages students to continue attending them and voicing their opinions. When the Student Senate reconvenes, the expectation is that many resolutions will be coming up for discussion and for a vote on areas regarding dining services (the reopening of the pub), intervis, etc. The task force was pleased to see students partake in the decision-making process for the upcoming second semester, and will continue to advocate for their involvement.”

A Report On The Student Response To The College Policies Regarding The COVID-19 Pandemic

The following statement was sent to the student body of Saint Anselm College on Monday, January 11, 2021 by the Student Government Association:

“Dear Saint Anselm students, 

The Student Response Task Force has completed its work in collecting student feedback regarding COVID-19 policies for the fall 2020 semester. This group, under the purview of the Student Government Association presents a comprehensive report on the student response to the college policies regarding the COVID-19 pandemic. 

The Student Response Task Force was established in order to give Saint Anselm students a forum to voice their thoughts and opinions regarding Saint Anselm College’s response to the COVID-19 pandemic. Not only was this Task Force meant to efficiently collect and present student feedback to the administration, the Task Force was created and run by students so as to allow fellow students to express their opinions and concerns in a more comfortable setting.  Furthermore, the Task Force has come together to supply student feedback to college administrators, so that they might use the student body’s perspective during preparations for our upcoming return to campus. The Task Force plans to be a continuous presence on campus, to work with the school administration, the student government, and the student body as we adapt to the strange time we find ourselves in. Readers will find the full report prepared by the Task Force attached directly below along with a short summary of the report’s recommendations.


Firstly, the Task Force recommends changes in a variety of college policies. For example, the reinstatement of intervisitation on campus. The Student Senate has already unanimously approved legislation endorsing the revival of limited intervisitation for students within dorm halls. The Task Force supported this legislation, and will continue to push for action from the Student Government on this, as well as other issues ranging from building hours to a reexamination of the academic calendar. 


Second, the Task Force found a need for more student representation in the decision-making process. While it is understandable that the college was faced with a high-pressure situation to return students to campus, it is regrettable that students were not consulted initially. Moving forward, the Task Force recommends the administration continue to prioritize student input on decision making committees in regards to decisions being made on COVID policy which affect the student body. Be they from athletics, student government, or another student program, a variety of students should be consulted throughout the spring semester. Thirdly, the Task Force has placed an emphasis on the need for transparency from the college administration on COVID policy. This may be in a variety of forms, such as expounding upon policies that are chosen by the school, as well as a formal notice to students regarding any and all policy changes. Transparency will be a necessary step for continued student engagement with the rules that are enforced, and an ongoing mutually respectful partnership between administrators and students.


The Task Force is encouraged by the engagement we have already received from the student body, and if this is the first you are hearing from us please feel free to reach out, as we will be active on campus for the foreseeable future. This will be in various capacities, through the Student Government Association, social media, and various other avenues should the need arise. We look forward to working with the administration as a conduit for student feedback and as a partner to craft policy moving forward. 


The entire report is attached to this email for review by the reader, and if you have any questions regarding this report, please reach out to us at sga@anselm.edu. The Student Response Task Force wishes you all well, and looks forward to returning to campus for the spring semester.”

Saint Anselm College’s COVID-19 prevention efforts: more reactive than proactive

As the average daily number of new cases in New Hampshire continues to rise, more than doubling now, from 40 new cases a day to 100 new cases a day, worries stir on campus over the college’s COVID-19 response. 

With COVID-19 cases rising in New Hampshire as well as nationally, the second semester will provide a new set of challenges for the college. The Hilltopper spoke with some of the students who have spent time in isolation housing as well as Director of Health Services Maura Marshall to better understand how these circumstances will impact the remainder of the year.

Saint Anselm College has seen a relatively low number of COVID-19 cases compared to other schools in the area such as the University of New Hampshire. Marshall attributes the low transmission rate across campus to the college’s ability to quickly find and isolate outbreaks on campus.

“It has to do with how quickly we can identify the cases,” said Marshall. “I think being from a small campus . . . we can get to the students a lot quicker.”

Students that have been in isolation housing agree with Marshall’s sentiment that the college has been quick with placing students in isolation once they have tested positive.

One student that tested positive said, “I got a call from Maura an hour after my [positive COVID] test. Then she told me I tested positive and she told me to pack my stuff.”

Most students in isolation housing were placed in Collins house, across the street from the college. Students that were in Collins say that they were provided adequate provisions, such as personal protection equipment (hand sanitizer, masks, and disinfectant wipes).

“Those big air loud purifier machines, every floor had one of those. Every floor had hand sanitizer and disinfectant wipe dispensers,” said one student. “Every floor had their own supplies basically.”

Students that were placed in Collins house were given some guidance on what to do in the case of a severe incident. One student recalled a particularly stressful moment in isolation.

“One night, one kid had really bad symptoms, and he was feeling really bad. And we were like, at what point [do we call 911]?” said one student. Students were given guidance in a pamphlet, but unsurprisingly, it was discarded by most students. 

“I’m pretty sure the paper said something, but like you know, in the moment, you’re not gonna like [remember],” they said.

That student has since recovered, but students still say it is unclear why more was not done to inform students about how to respond to medical emergencies while in Collins.

Contact tracing and quarantine for close contacts

The Hilltopper spoke with some students who went out of their own way to request a test out of their own moral responsibility.

“I went out with my friend, and then my friend’s roommate tested positive. So then me and the kid I was with, who hung out with him, went to health services and requested a test.”

Students that do not voluntarily request tests have to be tracked down through contact tracing. The State of New Hampshire leads the contact tracing effort throughout the state, including all colleges in New Hampshire.

“The state is in charge of contact tracing, so as soon as a student tests positive, we have to report that to the state,” said Marshall. “We have to identify close contacts, the state does this, but I help them a little bit . . . A close contact is defined as anyone that you’ve been in contact with less than six feet for more than ten minutes in the last 48 hours.” 

Close contacts are placed in quarantine for 14 days, either in their room or another residence hall. 

“They sent me to Holy Cross and Holy Cross has a pod that’s completely empty that they save for people that are close contacts. I would get tested like every four days,” said one student who was placed in quarantine and later tested positive. 

In this specific instance of quarantine, The Hilltopper was told that close contacts were not completely isolated from each other. 

The close contacts that were placed in Holy Cross had individual rooms, but still shared a kitchen and bathroom, presenting the possibility for transmission among the close contacts if one did carry COVID-19. 

The student that tested positive in Holy Cross said that they were the only one to test positive in that specific quarantine. 

“The rest of the pod, they were getting tested after me, none of them tested positive . . . I was the only one that tested positive. I told them to stay away since I figured I had it,” they said. 

Only slightly harsher policies

After the recent spike in cases, the college has had to clamp down harder on off-campus travel. A little more than a week ago, President Favazza sent a stern letter reminding students to not go off-campus, especially if going to more high-risk areas such as bars. The most notable part of the letter was the announcement that there will now be gatekeepers at all entrances and exits.

“Starting today, gatekeepers will be taking down the names of all students who leave campus and the time of their departure. They also will be time-stamping the time students return to campus,” said Favazza in the letter.

While the letter suggested that gatekeepers will always be present, they are normally only there during the evening on Thursday through Sunday, the days when most off-campus travel happens.

Additionally, the gatekeepers’ exact time schedules have been observed to be inconsistent, sometimes staying until midnight, and other times, leaving their post by 10:00 pm. 

The college has emphasized they want to avoid draconian-like policies to prevent the spread of COVID-19. The gatekeeper’s schedule reflects the college’s hesitance to establish stricter and harsher policies on campus. 

“Little ticking time-bombs”

The semester is ending which means around 2,000 students will be going home for winter break. This is happening as COVID-19 cases are rapidly surging in New Hampshire. Gov. Sununu has estimated that by the end of November, new COVID-19 cases will reach 1,000 per day. Only a small number of colleges and universities are requiring students to test negative for COVID-19 prior to their departure. 

Saint Anselm College is not one of these institutions requiring exit tests. 

The college has also not encouraged students to take exit tests before leaving. The most recent data regarding COVID-19 sent out to students reveals that as of November 12th, 81 students are currently either in quarantine or isolation. 

In an interview from The New York Times, A. David Paltiel, a professor of health policy and management at the Yale School of Public Health, said “there’s a responsibility not to unleash little ticking time bombs.”

Without mandatory exit testing, or even encouraged exit testing, there is a real possibility of students carrying COVID-19 back home. In the most recent COVID-19 health update from Marshall, the college has opted to ask students themselves to plan ahead with their families for when they return home.

In a recent email from Marshall, she told students, “If you foolishly decide to take a risk this weekend, please have a conversation about a plan and arrangements with your family.” 

Meghan Query contributed to this story

President Hosts Town Hall, Urges Community To Stay Calm

President Favazza held a virtual town hall over Zoom this Wednesday night in the wake of a small COVID-19 outbreak on campus. Although not all the questions answered directly related to the outbreak, Favazza did use the forum as an opportunity to continue to project what he has attempted to do since the middle of last March: stay ready, stay calm.

He began the evening’s forum by giving the facts about the outbreak: 8 new positive tests, 4 positives on Tuesday, 4 on Wednesday. All of the cases are among student-athletes, though he was unable to give more information on the cases for purposes of privacy. It is widely believed on campus that the virus made its way onto campus through Dominic Hall and its residents. State health officials and contact tracers are working on site tracing and containing the outbreak. President Favazza made it clear that there is no one “tipping point” the college would have to reach to send students home but also reminded us that some of these factors include the number of positive cases on campus, the density of cases in the Greater Manchester area, and the college’s capacity to test and contain the virus on campus.

President Favazza assured the viewers on Zoom that not only is the campus ready for this troubling event, but that they expected it and saw it as an inevitability. The President claimed that there could be “increased cleaning” as well as changes to the Spagnuolo Gym reservation system. Moreover, he noted that some athletic team meetings and conditioning sessions had been suspended. Beyond that, however, he continued to reinforce that Saint Anselm College would continue to stay the course, and no other major changes will take place, yet.

Some students pushed on this during the question-and-answer part of the evening. Some asked if the possibility of quarantining or testing all of Dominic Hall was in the cards. Favazza did note that there would be increased testing in Dominic, and as far as quarantining the building and whether or not it was a possibility, he said “Certainly. We are not there yet”. 

Throughout the evening, President Favazza answered questions from students who sounded concerned, frightened even, about their health and safety on campus. Favazza continued to tell these students if they aren’t normally contacted for random testing or by contact tracers, then they are at liberty to go to health services and request a test. However, President Favazza cited the college’s testing capacity as one measure of success, and there are concerns that increased student requests for testing would quickly stress that capacity. 

Continued partying and unsafe social practices were also frequent topics of discussion during the 60-minute forum. Students expressed concerns about crowds on the quads and in courtyards. To this, Favazza repeated the phrases, “We can’t be everywhere at once”, and “I would encourage them not to do that” more than once. There won’t be increased observation of student social behavior on campus; such a role is reserved to the student body and Residence Life staff. 

On the topic of RA’s and Residence Life, Favazza recognized the difficulties they have faced this semester with their increased risk and responsibilities. “I know they’re in a tougher role…Try to make it a little bit easier for them” he appealed to the student body. He also noted that if any RA, in the course of doing their job, feels as though they were at risk, they can request a test. There was no further mention of increased PPE supplies or assistance to student Residence Life employees (student employees were given face shields after increased complaints some time ago). 

Continuing on the path and staying the course was the theme of the night, with Favazza trying to project calm preparedness in his remarks. When asked about potential changes the college could make, he accepted some as possibilities, including adding Ben-and-Jerry’s ice cream to Davison Hall but balked at others, including Grill reservations, relaxing intervisitation, and a concrete plan to get student representation on the Board of Trustees. The Board is losing several senior members this year, including the Chair and Vice-Chair, and the administration has stated they want to wait until the legal dispute ends until they begin to add students on the BOT. Not only could this take months or years, but would likely be past the end of the pandemic and this inflection point is where student input is so sorely lacking.

During his remarks, President Favazza took time away from the outbreak on campus and directed his attention toward racial justice. He took his stance on the issue, which was nuanced but well measured. He affirmed unequivocally that “Black Lives Matter”, and called on the student body to recognize that in the history of our nation and society, Black Americans have faced myriad prejudices and disadvantages impeding them on the path to full citizenship. He remarked on his past growing up in Memphis TN, where most of the people he was around were black, and despite being from the same place, he recognized that his experience was different, because of the color of his skin. He called on the school’s duty to face racism “with courage”, but also to avoid depicting law enforcement with “broad and negative strokes”. He asked for “open minds and hearts”, and affirmed his belief that standing with and saying “Black Lives Matter” does not put one against law enforcement. 

The class of 2020 was not to be forgotten this evening, as the President discussed the ongoing dialogue between 2020 graduates and the school to host their commencement in a way where all graduates can celebrate. These talks are still in progress, but Favazza noted the 2020 banner in Davison Hall represented the unfinished business and commitment the school has to the class of 2020.

There were several positive notes on the night: CAB, Health Services Director Maura Marshall, Dining Hall staff, Residence Life staff, custodial staff, and many more were thanked and applauded for their efforts by Favazza. It is paramount that the Saint Anselm College community thank the selfless services of all those trying to make campus safe, and do all that they can to emulate the caring, community-oriented actions of those individuals and groups.

Despite the sometimes cheery mood (glad to know Pres. Favazza is a Patriots fan), the night was dominated by a sense of anxiety. President Favazza did his best to assuage the worst of these fears, but the campus is still tense. Even though Favazza was sure to say that no finger-pointing or blaming should take place, and he is right to do so, it is impossible to deny that students might be walking a bit faster past Dominic Hall this week.

*Since this article was written, 2 more cases of COVID-19 have been reported; 1 on 9/17 and 1 on 9/18. This brings the total number of positive cases on campus in the past week to 10.

Saint A’s Green Queens Work To Create A More Sustainable Campus

Hi All! Green Queens here! If you don’t already know, we are an RLC located in FBC on this beautiful campus. Our motivation for creating and applying to be an RLC was to show other college students that making simple and easy switches can help all of us to achieve more sustainability while living our college student lives. The following are our personal favorite simple switches we have made and integrated into our lives here at school since we’ve returned:

Manon: Living sustainably to me means making simple switches that I didn’t even know were possible before. Prior to doing our best to live a more sustainable lifestyle here on campus, I can admit that I didn’t know much. But, with the help of my friends and just a little bit of research I realized it doesn’t have to be so tough and intimidating. My favorite sustainable living hack has got to be reusing jars from around the house. Anything from pasta sauce jars to old mason jars you might find, cleaning them and peeling any label off gives you a new piece of sustainable and cute storage or decor for your living space.

Jen: Living sustainably to me means being conscious of how your lifestyle affects our planet. It means sacrificing convenience here and there to make switches that will benefit all of the people who will call this earth home after me. Making changes is not that hard once you realize how much of a difference you can make. My favorite sustainable living hack/change has been switching to solely reusable products to transport and store food and drinks. It used to be so instinctive to store items in plastic bags or purchase throw away travel cups. Now I have a whole set of glassware that makes things even more cost effective and way better for the planet.

Sam: Living sustainably for me is making switches that just make sense. After learning about the lack of recycling not just at school but around the world and the lack of care given to the planet we rely on I knew I personally had to make some changes. My goal for 2020 has been to eliminate using single use plastic. By doing this I have not only started to make switches that are more environmentally friendly but also save me money. My favorite switch I have made is bar shampoo and conditioner. Now not only am I now using products that completely cut out plastic but are healthier for my hair!

Haley: To me living sustainably is living with love and gratitude for the earth. It means helping to shape a community that will remain beautiful for decades to come. I work to live sustainably so I can continue to admire and share the beauties of our home. An easy sustainable living hack is to utilize thrift shopping as well as donating or multi-purposing  clothes you don’t wear. One way you can do this is by cutting up old and stained shirts to use as rags around the house.

Molly: Living sustainably to me is living with the intention to preserve our community and our home. It is founded in love- love for one another, love for the earth, love for our future. It is making small changes in your life to better the lives of our future grandkids and their kids. In my life, I try to reduce the amount of plastic I use as much as possible. You can do this too by using reusable bags or taking your own cup to the cafe to have it filled with your favorite pick-me-up. Throughout the pandemic, I’ve found that plastic is sometimes the only option. If you cannot avoid plastic, you can almost always find a way to reuse it. Some ways include washing to go containers for next time or reusing plastic bags. As long as you have the tools you need, living sustainably is quite easy.

In addition to making simple switches such as these, we began collecting recycling among the FBC community and delivering it to the local recycling plant on our own time. What started out as collecting in front of our apartment quickly became a feat too large for us to handle alone! With the help of the student body becoming so invested in bringing their recycling to our doors, we attracted the attention of administration and physical plant, which led to us getting a dumpster dedicated to recycling in the FBC area (this sits behind L, fenced off, and closest to the O-Zone). Take a walk up to FBC sometime, to drop off your recyclables and say hi to us in B6! Keep up the amazing work Saint A’s, we are so proud to be bringing some form of sustainability back to our campus community!

Follow the Green Queens of B6 on Instagram: @saintasgreenqueens